Course Categories: stage 5

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* Brenden Lowe

Step #4 – R&B Style

Stage 5 | Lesson: 46 | Step #4 – (theory) The R & B style doesn’t really require much from the keyboard player other than laying down solid harmonies for the tune. The drummer and bass player are in charge of the groove. All the jazz theory and knowledge we’ve learned can be applied to creating a harmonic base for tunes.

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* Brenden Lowe

Step #5 – Major 7th Popular Voicings 2

Stage 5 | Lesson: 46 | Step 5 – (theory) There are two unique qualities in this popular major 7th voicing. The first being the two whole step rubs you find in both hands. The second is the fact you have the 13 in the LH and the 9 in the RH so the extensions are split.

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* Brenden Lowe

Step #6 – Trane 2-5-1 Reharm

Stage 5 | Lesson: 46 | Step 6 – (theory) Utilizing Coltrane’s famous changes to reharm 2-5-1’s is very common practice in jazz. In this step we will be using his popular progression to reharm standard 2-5-1’s.

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* Brenden Lowe

Step #1 – New Orleans Street Beat Licks

Stage 5 | Lesson: 45 | Step 1 – (technique) The New Orleans style improvisation is very, VERY similar to jazz language. Almost identical. But…it’s the groove you need to be aware of. The drummer will not be playing a swing style, they’ll be playing a 2nd line style which has more of a bounce to it and is very “dancy”.

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* Brenden Lowe

Step #10 – Advanced Playing Concepts, Part 1

Stage 5 | Lesson: 45 | Step 10 – (repertoire) Once you get to a certain level you will be able to absorb information and apply it to your playing to create a more specific sound that you’re looking for. This step will talk more about this.

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* Brenden Lowe

Step #2 – Hexatonic Altered Chords (bV, bVI)

Stage 5 | Lesson: 45 | Step 2 – (theory) This is a very classic hexatonic sound that you’ll hear in a lot of jazz piano improv and comping. These two particular triads provide a lot of extensions and colors. The produce the #11, b9, b13, and #9.

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Course Categories: stage 5

Choose a search result from below.

* Brenden Lowe

Step #4 – R&B Style

Stage 5 | Lesson: 46 | Step #4 – (theory) The R & B style doesn’t really require much from the keyboard player other than laying down solid harmonies for the tune. The drummer and bass player are in charge of the groove. All the jazz theory and knowledge we’ve learned can be applied to creating a harmonic base for tunes.

Enter Now »
* Brenden Lowe

Step #5 – Major 7th Popular Voicings 2

Stage 5 | Lesson: 46 | Step 5 – (theory) There are two unique qualities in this popular major 7th voicing. The first being the two whole step rubs you find in both hands. The second is the fact you have the 13 in the LH and the 9 in the RH so the extensions are split.

Enter Now »
* Brenden Lowe

Step #6 – Trane 2-5-1 Reharm

Stage 5 | Lesson: 46 | Step 6 – (theory) Utilizing Coltrane’s famous changes to reharm 2-5-1’s is very common practice in jazz. In this step we will be using his popular progression to reharm standard 2-5-1’s.

Enter Now »
* Brenden Lowe

Step #1 – New Orleans Street Beat Licks

Stage 5 | Lesson: 45 | Step 1 – (technique) The New Orleans style improvisation is very, VERY similar to jazz language. Almost identical. But…it’s the groove you need to be aware of. The drummer will not be playing a swing style, they’ll be playing a 2nd line style which has more of a bounce to it and is very “dancy”.

Enter Now »
* Brenden Lowe

Step #10 – Advanced Playing Concepts, Part 1

Stage 5 | Lesson: 45 | Step 10 – (repertoire) Once you get to a certain level you will be able to absorb information and apply it to your playing to create a more specific sound that you’re looking for. This step will talk more about this.

Enter Now »
* Brenden Lowe

Step #2 – Hexatonic Altered Chords (bV, bVI)

Stage 5 | Lesson: 45 | Step 2 – (theory) This is a very classic hexatonic sound that you’ll hear in a lot of jazz piano improv and comping. These two particular triads provide a lot of extensions and colors. The produce the #11, b9, b13, and #9.

Enter Now »
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